The Lady with the Pet Dog Summary & Analysis

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The Lady with the Pet Dog Summary & Analysis

The Lady with the Pet Dog: Introduction

There are two versions of “The Lady with the Pet Dog,” and one can readily observe some similarities and differences, although they seem a bit debatable. However, the plots are quite the same in both versions, along with the setting, symbolism, and characterization, and they both infer a common moral lesson. In both stories, the audience experiences the love between Gurov and Anna in which they finally realize their true love. The authors tend to use third person narrative when they try to elaborate on the love theme. Although there are several differences, both stories do not include other characters, which makes readers more relatable to the storyline. Upon analyzing both stories, one can realize that while Chekhov exhibits a more female point of view, Oates sounds more like to hell from a male point of view.

Body Paragraphs

The setting of both stories sounds different from each other. Both stories happen at different times. Oates’ story is in the 20th century, while Chekhov’s storyline occurs in the 19th century of Russia. In Chekhov’s story, when they meet, they instantly realize that they have something hidden in common. Subsequently, a set of gatherings finally lead to a strong relationship, although it all starts with a simple step. Although both characters were aware of the fact that their relationship is not legal, they continue. They believe that the only way of their bilateral happiness stems from their encounter and love.

On the other hand, Oates’ plot is quite similar to the Chekhov’s, but Oates makes use of the feminist point of view, unlike Chekhov. The selection of the word “the stranger” until the plot reveals his name, can be an indicator of Oates’ feminist approach. In Oates’ version, Anna meets Gurov when she is on her way. Also, Oates defines the setting so that it fits the modernism approach in the 70s (Paul, para. 6). Moreover, although non-characterization is quite vivid in Oates’ storytelling (Gurov is referred to as stranger until a late point in the text). Nevertheless, Anna feels deep love with this stranger.

In terms of the viewpoints, one can clearly infer that Chekhov is concentrated on the chronological order of events, more like in a linear way. More specifically, the incidents in the storyline follow each other orderly. For instance, they meet, they become close and closer, they fall in love, some mistakes happen, and the story finishes.

On the other hand, circular storytelling is quite observable in Oates’ version. The author tends to flashback within the incidents surrounding the storyline. That is, while depicting a scene, the author keeps going back to where it started, the source of events to highlight a specific aspect through the storyline.

Both of the stories highlight the dog as the centre of meetings between the two characters. While Chekhov’s storyline initially introduces the dog, Oates’ text does not introduce the dog until the middle of the story, and in this version, the dog is owned by Anna’s lover, unlike Chekhov’s story. Furthermore, upon deeply analyzing both stories, one can readily sense that while Chekhov’s approach to the affair was positive, Oates’ view was anti-affair. The reader can sense these distinct approaches within the texts.

The significant difference is the male and female approach shown by the two different authors. While Chekhov adapts the story from the perspective of the male character, Oases focuses comparably on the consciousness of the female character. This situation creates two relatively distinct points of view. In this sense, the reader can sense the confusion and masculinity associated with the male character. Chekhov begins to depict the female inferiority to men at the beginning, but the tables turn at the end into confusion in the male character’s mind. In a way, this approach shows the male confusion when encountered with true love or when felt weak or unprotected against feelings (Chekhov 12. Oates tends to describe a typical woman with many emotions. Her main character, Anna, shows signs of extreme lust, fear, guilt, and even thoughts of suicide (Oates 13). The woman reflects her feelings against the feelings of confusion, and she merely wants love and certainty, unlike the male character’s traits at the beginning. However, regardless of the different approaches taken by the authors, one can highlight the magnificent depiction and analysis of both authors.

The Lady with the Pet Dog: Conclusion

In conclusion, in this assignment, both versions of “The Lady with the Pet Dog” has been analyzed in terms of similarities, differences, settings, character depictions, plots, and inconsistencies with each other. Upon analysis, it has become clear that settings are different from each other. Also, the points of views of authors are quite distinct. While one takes the feminine approach, the other one takes a more masculine depiction naturally. Furthermore, while Chekhov tends to depict chronologically and linearly, Oates chooses to create flashbacks and go back in stories in a circular manner in order to highlight the subconscious of the actions taken in the story. Both versions are useful for the reader. While the first one creates a robust story, the other one leads to the psychological embracement of the characters as the reader observes theİR internal reasoning. Both stories revolve around the dog as the central part of their encounter. After all, upon analyzing both stories, one can realize that while Chekhov exhibits a more female point of view, Oates sounds more like to hell from a male point of view.

References

Chekhov, Anton. “The Lady with the Pet Dog” The Compact Bedford Introduction to Literature. Meyer, Michael. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2000.

Oates, Carol. “The Lady with the Pet Dog” The Compact Bedford Introduction to Literature. Meyer, Michael. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2000.

Paul, Robert. “The Modern Woman in Joyce Carol Oates” The Lady with the Pet Dog. 2006. Web.

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Zendaya
Content Lead at Tamara Research. Major in Advertising, loves working.

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